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Hudson River School (second)

Page history last edited by Camilo Ruiz 10 years, 2 months ago

25. Hudson River School: In the early 1800s art suffered in the United States, primarily because of a constant need to make a living, and thus, little leisure time. Further, artists lacked a wealthy class to serve as patrons, and Puritan prejudice marked art as a sinful waste of time. The few American artists to emerge were primarily concerned with portraits; however, after the War of 1812, the nationalist upsurge shifted the focus of art from portraits to romantic paintings of American landscapes. The Hudson River School, a group of American landscape painters as well as the first native school of painting in the United States, served as a source of fuel for this new movement of art. The school also reflected a growing American desire to separate its art forms and painters from those of European origin, and embraced romantic ideals, mainly an attempt to capture nature unaltered by man. Although the Hudson River School, and the movement which it reflected, declined during the Civil War, it mirrored the growing optimism of 19th century America. Camilo Ruiz

 

 

A painting produced by Mikel Arrizabalaga of the Hudson River School.

 

For more information about the Hudson River School, click on any of the following links:

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/ihas/icon/hudson.html 

http://americanhistory.abc-clio.com/Search/Display/570565?terms=Hudson+River+School

http://www.school.eb.com/eb/article-9041395?query=Hudson%20River%20School&ct=

 

I commented on:

https://mstartzman.pbworks.com/w/page/Burned-Over-District-(sixth)#comment1288658799

https://mstartzman.pbworks.com/w/page/Louis-Daguerre-(seventh)#comment1288659238

https://mstartzman.pbworks.com/w/page/New-Harmony-(seventh)#comment1288659415

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